Greg Morrow (drelmo) wrote,
Greg Morrow
drelmo

This May Be Harder Than I Thought

In the real world, the Dolomites are a part of the Italian Alps.

I am running an RPG set in a Greco-Roman world, and fantasy worlds always need mountains for various monsters to live in.

Dolomite, of course, makes one think of the blaxploitation character.

Therefore, clearly, the chunk of mountains in my Greco-Roman world should have a name derived from a blaxploitation character. Because that's how my mind works.

However, characters like Shaft, Truck Turner, TNT Jackson, Foxy Brown, etc., do not obviously lend themselves to pseudo-Greek or pseudo-Latin names. I suppose Willie Dynamite could lead to the Dynamites, but that's a little transparent; I'd like something that isn't English per se.
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Well, if you want to stretch definitions a bit, there's the Calrissians.

(There appears to be a memey viral thingamabob along those lines going on right at this very moment, in fact, so that may be too trendy for your world...)
You could call them the Sweetbacks, for reasons lost to time.
If translated into dog-Latin, that might work.
The Roundtrees
The Hammers
The Wheatstraws
The Coffys

All for reasons similar to those alluded to above...
Frans Vulpes
Foxy Brown, I take it?
The same. Or just call them the Frans Mountains and have a pair of tall peaks close together called The Vulpes.
From the linguistic dustbin of grossly inappropriate figures of speech, you could call them "The Woodpiles."

Despite its purely annoying etymology, "The Urkels" has a mosterish/geologic ring to it.

What's "Red Fox" in Greek?
I remember that "kokkino" is "red". Google translate tells us that "fox" becomes "alepoú" (αλεπού) when pushed over to Greek.

Tinkering around with pluralization rules gets us "kókkines alepoúdes" (κόκκινες αλεπούδες) - "red foxes". I believe the comedian spelled it with two D's and two X's, though.
Petey Wheatstraw was a later film made by the by the producers of Dolomite; I find "The Wheatstraw Mountains" a charming name.